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Takakazu Yumoto

Our laboratory is concentration on foods and habitats of primates, feeding behavior, and relationships between primates and other organisms, mainly in Yakushima Island in Japan, and many tropical forests in Malaysia, Congo RD, Gabon, Brazil. Graduate students belong to Primatology and Wildlife Research, Division of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University. Please visit us at Inuyama, Aichi Prefecture, if you are interested in Yakushima Island or tropical rainforests.

Dr. Takakazu Yumoto

Takakazu Yumoto

Professor, Director of CICASP

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Andrew MacIntosh

Parasitic diseases can have profound impacts on the health and fitness of wildlife populations, but much is yet unknown regarding the mechanisms underlying their infection dynamics. My research focuses on investigating factors important to parasitic disease transmission in wildlife populations, both intrinsic and extrinsic to the host individual, and attempting to determine the health and fitness costs associated with infection. Because such costs are not often readily observable in the wild, I am also exploring the utility of applying fractal analysis to animal behavior as a bio-indicator of health in free-ranging animals (e.g. primates and penguins). 

Dr. Andrew J. J. MacIntosh

Andrew MacIntosh

Associate Professor

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Yuko Hattori

I am interested in how individuals develop and maintain good relationships in their social environments, and what kinds of communication are used while they interact with each other. Currently, I am focusing on behavioral synchrony and body movement matching in chimpanzees with respect to how these behaviors affect their social relationships. I'm also interested in the evolutionary origins of human musical activities such as dancing and singing. 

Dr. Yuko Hattori

Yuko Hattori

Assistant Professor

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Claire F. I. Watson

Socially transmitted behaviours form the basis of culture. I am especially intrigued by social and communicative cultural variation in non-human primates. My research involves empirical, behavioural studies on captive monkeys. I investigate primate social cognition, in particular social influence on social behaviours and traditions. Other avenues of research include vocalisations in common marmosets and improving primate welfare through enrichment.

Dr. Claire F. I. Watson

Claire F. I. Watson

Postdoctoral Research Fellow

Students

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Cecile Sarabian

How do animals - living in environments where parasites and pathogens are ubiquitous, avoid infection? With an evolutionary approach to hygiene and disgust, my research focuses on investigating parasite/pathogen avoidance strategies in Papionini and Hominini through field experiments, behavioral observations and parasitology. Better understanding infection-risk avoidance behaviors can have implications in both conservation and public health strategies by informing the design of interventions important in disease control. 

CICASP graduate student Cecile Sarabian

Cecile Sarabian

PhD Candidate (D3)

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Duncan Wilson

My research interests lie in animal cognition and emotion. I am particularly interested in using cognitive measures from human research to assess emotional states and welfare in non-human primates. My recent research has focused on behavioural laterality (eye preferences) as a potential measure of emotional responses in tufted capuchin monkeys. I am currently investigating the relationship between attentional bias and emotion in chimpanzees using touch screen experiments.

Duncan Wilson

PhD Candidate (D2)

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Rafaela Sayuri Takeshita

My main research interest is the use of non-invasive endocrinology in non-human primates to understand how the environment influences welfare and reproductive fitness. My previous studies included health evaluation of captive owl monkeys and measurement of adrenal hormones in captive Japanese macaques. I believe that it is important to study the behavior and physiology of wild primates in order to improve the condition of those living in captivity, and to provide them an environment as closer as possible from their natural habitat. 

Rafaela Sayuri Takeshita

PhD Candidate (D3)

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Jie Gao

I'm interested in comparative cognitive science. I'm working with captive chimpanzees in Primate Research Institute, Kyoto University. My recent research is about their understanding of a circular relationship, the rule of the rock-paper-scissors game. During the generalization test, we found interesting reactions towards body part stimuli from the chimpanzees, and that inspired me to study about their perception for bodies. There have been many studies on face perception, but how chimpanzees perceive bodies is not clear. Now I'm focusing on this topic, starting with the investigation of the body inversion effect.

Jie Gao

PhD Candidate (D1)

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Liesbeth Frias

I am interested in how variations in host community composition influence parasite transmission, especifically to what extent parasites are shared across primate hosts (in contrast to being host-specific), whether parasites correlate with/ influence host community structure, and the relationship between habitat fragmentation and both primate and parasite biodiversity. To approach these questions, I am surveying (gastrointestinal) parasite community assemblages in a multi-host system of primates living sympatrically in the Kinabatangan River (Malaysian Borneo). Ultimately my research aims to enhance basic understanding of community level epidemiology involving primates and their parasites in current landscapes for application in wildlife health monitoring, conservation and management, and public health awareness related to parasite transmission between wildlife and human populations. 

CICASP graduate student Liesbeth Frias

Liesbeth Frias

PhD Candidate (D2)

Alumni

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Tetsuro Matsuzawa

Dr. Tetsuro Matsuzawa is the founding director of CICASP, and a professor in the Department of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, Section of Language and Intelligence. His work in the laboratory at PRI is known as the "Ai project", named after the chimpanzee (Ai) that has been the focus of this pioneering research for more than 29 years. Dr. Matsuzawa has complemented the Ai project with observation of and field-experimentation with the chimpanzee community at Bossou, Guinea, West Africa, since 1986. This research encompasses the synergy of laboratory and field research, and aims to develop a comprehensive and holistic understanding of chimpanzee cognition. 

Tetsuro Matsuzawa

Tetsuro Matsuzawa

Distinguished Professor, Kyoto University Institute for Advanced Studies, Founding Director of CICASP

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Fred B. Bercovitch

The pivotal issue forming a foundation for both conservation and evolutionary biology involves determining factors that influence variation in reproductive success. My research interests, experience, and background aim at meshing social behavior, ecology, genetics, demography, life history, endocrinology, and evolution into a framework for increasing our understanding of mating systems and reproductive strategies.

Dr. Fred B. Bercovitch

Fred B. Bercovitch

Adjunct Professor, Kyoto University (former CICASP Professor 2010-2017)

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David A. Hill

My research examines aspects of the behaviour, ecology and conservation of mammals in forest habitats. Although I spent many years working on macaques, my current research focuses on insectivorous bats. I am interested in the effects of habitat disturbance on the distribution and population dynamics of forest bats, and how secondary forest habitats can be managed to protect and enhance bat communities. I am also investigating social systems of bats and specifically the role of vocal communication in social interactions within and between groups. 

David A. Hill

Adjunct Professor, Kyoto University (former CICASP Professor 2010-2015)

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Ikuma Adachi

My long-term research goal is to better understand the evolution of cognitive abilities in human and non-human animals. My current research has focused on whether non-human animals form cross-modal representations of familiar individuals and species as well as underlying perceptual system behind this. I’m also interested in multi-species comparison and I have studied a wide variety of species, including chimpanzees, four species of old-world monkeys, three species of new-world monkeys, pigeons, dogs, horses. These investigations were conducted in the laboratory using both operant and non-operant paradigms to measure cognitive function.
Dr. Ikuma Adachi

Ikuma Adachi

Associate Professor (former CICASP Assistant Professor 2010-2017)

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Lucie Rigaill

I started my Doctoral course in April 2013 at the Primate Research Institute of Kyoto University under the supervision of Prof. Takeshi Furuichi (Social Systems Evolution Section PRI) and Dr. Cécile Garcia (CNRS - Muséum de l'Homme, France) . Since my Master thesis, I am interested in male and femal mating strategies, with a particular focus on how female behavioral, visual & auditory signals and olfactory cues modulate mate choice among primates. My on-going research on the Japanese macaques sexual signaling combines behavioral and experimental studies in both wild (Koshima Island) and captive (PRI) populations.

Lucie Rigaill

Associate Researcher, Musee de l'homme, Paris (former CICASP PhD student 2013-2017)

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Sofi Bernstein

Currently, my research interests include the study of signal systems in non-human animals, particularly vocal communication in non-human primates. My work integrates bioacoustics and cognitive ethology, and I mostly focus on the Macaca genus. I participate in an ongoing collaboration with Anhui University and Central Washington University at the Valley of the Wild Monkeys,China where longitudinal data is being collected on a free-ranging troop of Tibetan macaques. 

Sofi Bernstein

Lecturer, Central Washington University (former CICASP PhD student 2013-2016)