International Course in Primatology and Wildlife Research

International Course in Primatology and Wildlife Research

The International Course in Primatology and Wildlife Research is a graduate program of Kyoto University that focuses on the study of non-human primates and other wild animals to promote their conservation, health and welfare, and to advance our understanding of wildlife and human nature. Graduate students enroll in either the MSc or PhD course with one of the existing sections at Kyoto University's Primate Research Institute (PRI), or alternatively at Kyoto University's Wildlife Research Center (WRC). Both degrees offered are research-focused, but Master's students are also required to complete a set of courses and training programs provided by either PRI or WRC. Students who have successfully completed their Master's degrees typically progress to the PhD program. MSc students have to take a series of classes in Primatology from April to June, but some of the classes are not taught in English but slides and supplementary information in English are available.

PRI was established in 1967 and has, for the past five decades, promoted basic research synthesizing various approaches to understanding the nature of primates, including humans. PRI presently has approximately 40 faculty members (full professors, associate professors, and assistant professors), and between 40 and 50 graduate students, who belong to Kyoto University's Graduate School of Science. There are about 25 postdoctoral researchers, 10 veterinarians, 10 administrative staff members, 10 technicians, and 90 part-time employees. In addition, the institute is home to over 1100 nonhuman primates of 14 species. The International Center (CICASP) is staffed by international and Japanese faculty members and administrators fluent in English. They will be on hand to help you with the entrance procedure and with your daily life in Japan.

WRC aims to promote scientific research on wild animals and education. Its missions are: 1) conducting basic research on endangered and threatened species of wild animals, 2) integrating different areas of science to create new disciplines applicable to field settings, and 3) collaborating with zoos, sanctuaries, aquariums, and museums, etc., to promote environmental education especially among young people. WRC now also employs faculty and administrators fluent in English to support international students.

These MSc and PhD programs are highly recommended for anyone wishing to study primatology and other wildlife research. Students enrolled at either the PRI or WRC have also benefitted from special funding opportunities in the past, enabling them to go abroad for laboratory training and fieldwork.