Duncan Wilson

PhD Candidate (D2)

Language and Intelligence Section

Research

My research interests lie in animal cognition and emotion. I am particularly interested in using cognitive measures from human research to assess emotional states and welfare in non-human primates. My recent research has focused on behavioural laterality (eye preferences) as a potential measure of emotional responses in tufted capuchin monkeys. I am currently investigating the relationship between attentional bias and emotion in chimpanzees using touch screen experiments.

Background

After graduating with a BSc (Hons) in Psychology from the University of Hull (UK), I worked as a Research Assistant in Psychology at Flinders University (Australia), and an Assistant Language Teacher on the Japan Exchange and Teaching (JET) Programme. I returned to the UK to study for an MSc in Applied Animal Behaviour and Animal Welfare at the University of Edinburgh, where I developed an interest in non-human primate welfare. This led to a position as a PhD Student at the Kyoto University Primate Research Institute, where I am investigating the relationship between attentional bias and emotion in chimpanzees using touch screen experiments.

 

 

 

Selected Publications

Wilson, D. A., Tomonaga, M., Vick, S-J. (2016). Eye preferences in capuchin monkeys (Sapajus apella). Primates, 57, 3, 433-440.

Tlauka, M., Donaldson, P., Wilson, D. (2008). Forgetting in spatial memories acquired in a virtual environment. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 22, 1, 69-84.

Wilson, P. N., Wilson, D. A., Griffiths, L., Fox, S. (2007). First-perspective spatial alignment effects from real-world exploration. Memory & Cognition, 35, 1432-1444.

Contact

Kyoto University Primate Research Institute, 41-2 Kanrin, Inuyama City, Aichi Prefecture, 484-8506, Japan